Preserving Biodiversity

Conservation

Biodiversity is the backbone that supports all life on Earth. Over a million species are at risk of extinction, largely due to man-made threats including habitat destruction, poaching, human encroachment, invasive species, and climate change. Among these, human encroachment in particular has intensified human-wildlife conflicts around the globe.  

Our goal is to preserve biodiversity, including keystone and iconic species, both globally and locally. By protecting wildlife and their habitats, we secure the future of the natural world and our ability to sustainably benefit from its key resources for our livelihoods, food supplies, tourism, and health.



Conservation

Countering Poaching and Conflict

Between 2009 and 2015 alone, 100,000 African elephants and more than 3,000 rhinos were killed by poachers and human-wildlife conflicts. Organized criminal networks are responsible for the poaching and illegal killing of millions of wild animals around the world. Illegal wildlife trade has a devastating impact and can lead to local and global extinction. We’re committed to developing software that helps protected areas monitor and safeguard wildlife, partnering in anti-trafficking efforts, and generating awareness and policy changes globally as well as in the Pacific Northwest.

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Conservation

Surveying and Monitoring

It’s imperative to have accurate wildlife population data in order to convey the magnitude of conservation issues. Without updated numbers, it’s impossible for policy makers and concerned organizations to know what actions to take. Data on wildlife populations is also important for measuring the efficacy of protection programs. That’s why we’re committed to advancing state-of-the-art practices in science, technology, and machine learning to survey populations and provide vital data and analysis, such as accurate animal counts.

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Conservation

Preserving Biodiversity in the Pacific Northwest

In California, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, salmon are extinct in nearly 40% of the rivers they are known to inhabit, with at least 106 major stocks gone forever. In Alaska, many salmon populations are under threat from development. We’re focused on preserving biodiversity by removing dams to support salmon populations, educating local populations on this crisis, and supporting research to better understand the link between nutrition and reproductive health for orcas.

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Climate Program

Responding to Climate Change

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