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Why CITES CoP17 Is a Crucial Moment for Wildlife

9/23/2016

Why CITES CoP17 Is a Crucial Moment for Wildlife

9/23/2016

As delegates from more than 180 countries prepare to gather for the Seventeenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17) of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Sept. 24-Oct. 5 in Johannesburg, the fate of key wildlife species hinges on the agreements that will be hammered out.
 
The recent surge in wildlife trafficking is unprecedented. Nearly 7,000 species of wild animals and plants are threatened by this illicit trade. Demand for ivory is so great that the iconic African savanna elephant population has been cut by almost a third over seven years, according to recent results from our Great Elephant Census (GEC). Vast stretches of the ocean where sharks once roamed have shown to be empty through the Global FinPrint. That means securing new protections for these species at CITES — the premier international agreement between governments to address the problem — is vital.
 
CoP17 has been a priority for the team at Vulcan. Armed with extensive data from the GEC and seeing the destruction of elephants firsthand, we’re encouraging those who do vote to look at the “bulletproof” data and to go further to end the ivory trade. Although many countries have committed close the ivory trade, all countries must adopt domestic bans to protect these iconic species.
 
Read the rest on our Medium blog.

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