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No Fooling: 6 Things At Vulcan That Aren’t April Fools Jokes

4/1/2015

No Fooling: 6 Things At Vulcan That Aren’t April Fools Jokes

4/1/2015

This isn't April Fools, but in the spirit of the day, we created a list of the things that we do here at Vulcan that, at first glance, might sound too remarkable to be true. Here are just six awesome examples from our portfolio. 

  1. The world’s largest airplane. Using six 747 engines and a wingspan of over 380 feet—the same length as a football field—the carrier aircraft for the Stratolaunch system will be the largest plane ever constructed. 

 

  1. We own one of the loudest buildings in the world. CenturyLink Field, home of the Seattle Seahawks and Sounders celebrates its noise. A Guinness World Record (up until 2014) and fan-induced earthquakes to boast, it has a right to. The loudest record at the stadium came in at 137.6 decibels or what it sounds like when a jet fighter takes off from an aircraft carrier.

  1. We’re trying to count every savanna elephant we can in Africa. Literally. While there are studies estimating the number of elephant deaths (100,000 in three years), we don’t know how many are still alive. To address this problem, the Allen-led Great Elephant Census is flying 20 African countries to count as many elephants as we can. We have completed 50% of the flights, covering over 136,000 km.

  1. We play three sports. As a company owned by Paul G. Allen, we root for the three professional sports teams he owns. So, essentially, there isn't a time we're not playing to win. We play football (Seattle Seahawks), basketball (Portland Trail Blazers) and the other football (Seattle Sounders).

  1. We found the world’s largest battleship. This past March, an Allen-led research team located the Musashi, a World War II Japanese battleship. The ship was one of the world’s largest battleships in naval history.

  1. Our museums are alive. At Vulcan, we believe that our museums aren't places just to gaze upon relics, but rather they should be interactive experiences. The computers at the Living Computer Museum have been restored to full working order and the iconic military machines at the Flying Heritage Collection are rebuilt so that they can fly, roll or crawl again.